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pussyharvest:

jesuswithalacefront:

gadaboutgreen:

scienceyoucanlove:

How many women can you guess? Do you remember/know what each one of them did/discovered?

Once you make your guess, head over to All Science, All the Time to see if you were right:http://ow.ly/pXjrG

Oh wow, that’s AN AWESOME LIST OF WHITE WOMEN SCIENTISTS! But how could you forget:

Asima Chatterjee: The awesome Indian woman who help discover drugs we use to treat cancer, malaria, and epilepsy!

OR

Chien-Shiung Wu: THE FIRST LADY OF PHYSICS?! 

OR WHADDABOUT

Ellen Ochoa: The first Latina in SPACE! AND the First Latina Director of the Johnson Space Center.

Oo, and don’t forget!!

Flossie Wong-Staal: The woman that successfully map HIV and pave the way to prove that HIV causes AIDS. 

GURL!

Mae Jemison: First Black woman IN SPACE!!! And worked the first flight into space after the Challenger Accident.

But don’t stop!

Patricia Bath: The First Black woman doctor awarded a patent for a medical device: a laser that removes cataracts! (Fancy that!)

AND THE BOSSEST!

Shirley Ann Jackson: The first Black woman to earn a PhD from MIT in nuclear physics.

Hot damn! Women of Color in Science!!! 

reblogging solely for the criticisms and shade.

I’m fucking cackling

fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.

Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.

It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 

The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.

You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.

Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.

It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 

The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.

You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.

Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.

It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 

The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.

You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.
Zoom Info
fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.

Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.

It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 

The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.

You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.
Zoom Info

fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.
Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.
It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 
The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.
You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.

storyofagayboy:

About 36 hours ago, I spoke out against the Israeli invasion and slaughter of Gaza, within that 36 hours, I have lost over 1,000 follows, received dozens of hate messages and death threats, and people are now threatening to “take down” my tumblr. People have also concluded that I am Muslim and part of Hamas, despite the fact that I am an Atheist and look at all religion as false. I literally cannot decide whether to be more amused or disgusted. I cannot fathom why we are once again defending Israel when they have now killed over 500 innocent people, 70% of which are children and women. They are not defending themselves, they are committing terrorism in a land they want as their own. Their citizens have literally started camping on a mountain to watch and cheer as rockets fall on Gaza, home to 1.8 million people. As I have said many times, both sides are scum for putting innocent people at risk, but if you believe Israel is only “defending” themselves or that they are somehow on an equal playing field, you are extremely misinformed. If you would not trade places with someone in Gaza right now over someone in Israel, that means you know the truth but choose to ignore it. I just cannot believe that I am getting death threats for wanting peace. I try to see the best in humanity, but right now, I see no humanity.

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